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Monday, July 11, 2005

BlueTooth Defined



Definition: Bluetooth is a specification for the use of low-power radio communications to wirelessly link phones, computers and other network devices over short distances. The name "Bluetooth" is borrowed from Harald Bluetooth, who was a king in Denmark more than 1,000 years ago.

Bluetooth technology was designed primarily to support simple wireless networking of personal consumer devices and peripherals, including cell phones, PDAs, and wireless headsets. The wireless signals transmitted in Bluetooth reach over short distances, typically up to 30 feet (10 meters). Bluetooth devices generally communicate at less than 1 Mbps. (continued...)

Bluetooth networks feature a dynamic topology called a piconet or PAN. Piconets contain a minimum of two and a maximum of eight Bluetooth peer devices. Devices communicate using protocols that are part of the Bluetooth Specification. Version 1.1 of the specification is in widespread use today with versions 1.2 and 2.0 under development.

Although the Bluetooth standard utilizes the same 2.4 Ghz range as 802.11b and 802.11g, Bluetooth technology is not a suitable Wi-Fi replacement. Compared to Wi-Fi, Bluetooth networking is much slower, a bit more limited in range, and supports many fewer devices.

As is true for Wi-Fi and other wireless technologies today, concerns with Bluetooth include security and interoperability with other networking standards.

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